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NORC News

Brown and Allison appear on major network morning shows to discuss the effects of eating versus skipping breakfast

August 21, 2015

UAB Nutrition Obesity Research Center (NORC) and Office of Energetics researchers recently appeared on NBC’s The Today Show and ABC’s Good Morning America as experts in the field of obesity to address the question of whether eating breakfast aids in reducing weight.

Andrew W Brown, Ph.D.

Scientist Andrew W. Brown, PhD—who is currently investigating the fidelity of the reporting of obesity-related scientific literature, in addition to the strength of scientific research supporting common suggestions for affecting weight loss, weight maintenance, or the prevention of obesity—pointed out on The Today Show that more research is needed before definitive recommendations can be made. Drs. Brown and Allison collaborated on “Belief beyond the evidence: using the proposed effect of breakfast on obesity to show 2 practices that distort scientific evidence,” published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, in which they highlight the challenges of conducting scientific investigations on topics with strong beliefs, such as breakfast and obesity. They also collaborated on “Myths, Presumptions, and Facts about Obesity,” published in The New England Journal of Medicine, and “Weighing the Evidence of Common Beliefs in Obesity Research,” published in Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition, which tackled several widely accepted obesity-related ideas, including unsubstantiated presumptions about the benefits of regularly eating breakfast.

Andrew W Brown, Ph.D.

NORC Director David B. Allison, PhD, interviewed by Good Morning America, is well known and respected for challenging commonly held beliefs about nutrition that are not supported by solid evidence. His stance is reinforced by conclusions reached in such research as “The Effectiveness of Breakfast Recommendations on Weight Loss: A Randomized Controlled Trial,” published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, in which he and co-authors found that eating or skipping breakfast had “no discernable effect on weight loss in free-living adults who were attempting to lose weight.”

To watch The Today Show piece with Dr. Brown’s appearance and to read the accompanying article, click here; to view the Good Morning America segment with Dr. Allison’s interview, click here.